Tourism Research

Southwest

In 2013, the average age of Alaska fishery permit holders was 49.7 years, up ten years since 1980. As many Alaska fishery permit holders approach retirement age, next generation fishing will greatly impact coastal communities. UA is approaching the problem of the “graying of the fleet,” and developing alternatives to address this growing problem.

Southcentral

Southeast Alaska has some of the world’s highest rates of glacial volume loss. 

This collaboration between UA and the US Geological Survey has improved our understanding of the roles glaciers play in Gulf of Alaska coastal systems, and their impacts on the tourism and salmon fishery industries — each of which provide $1 billion in annual economic activity to Alaska.

Southcentral

Pacific halibut supports valuable commercial, sport and subsistence fisheries throughout the Gulf of Alaska. Declining halibut stocks over the past 20 years has led to increased restrictions for commercial and sport fisheries. Are halibut competing for shared resources with a burgeoning population of arrowtooth flounder? UAF is examining resource partitioning between arrowtooth flounder and Pacific halibut to better understand their potential competition for shared prey, including walleye pollock.

Southeast

Nearshore ecosystems are often overlooked in acidification studies, even though these habitats are crucial in planning for mariculture operation, fisheries monitoring, harmful algal blooms and paralytic shellfish poisoning. In this most extensive ferry-based ocean chemistry monitoring project in North America, UA is providing unparalleled, broad, and long-term coverage of nearshore marine habitats from Bellingham, WA to Skagway, AK.

Arctic

UA is partnering with shipping companies to better understand strong wind events and develop forecast tools for industry. Marine transporters in Alaska and the North Pacific need tailored information about sailing conditions. UAF’s new products enable quicker “go/no-go” decisions, as well as monthly to seasonal outlooks for scheduling and routing.

Southwest

UA is partnering with shipping companies to better understand strong wind events and develop forecast tools for industry. Marine transporters in Alaska and the North Pacific need tailored information about sailing conditions. UAF’s new products enable quicker “go/no-go” decisions, as well as monthly to seasonal outlooks for scheduling and routing.

Southcentral

The Alaska Volcano Observatory at UAF analyzes satellite data twice daily for thermal anomalies and ash plumes for about 80 volcanoes in the North Pacific. Thermal anomalies at volcanic vents have been detected up to several weeks before large eruptions. Volcanic ash in the atmosphere is a serious hazard to jet aircraft; working with the National Weather Service to predict where winds will carry the ash, UA assists the Federal Aviation Administration in warning pilots of potential risks.