Lands & Waterways Research

Southeast

We are informing forest managers and mill operators on the extent of the decline of this commercially and culturally valuable species. This includes future risk assessment, regeneration potential, and opportunities for salvage logging.

Arctic, Interior, Southcentral, Southeast, Southwest

Our researchers at UAF are developing and supporting the Advanced Laboratory and Field Arrays for Marine Energy project to address critical needs for lowering the cost of river and ocean energy converters, and to advance hydrokinetic energy’s role in global renewable energy.

Arctic

Human access routes to coastal Arctic subsistence resources are changing and disappearing as temperatures warm. Our Fisheries Center is studying subsistence users’ access to marine resources in the coastal Western Arctic National Parklands. The work helps the Parks Service in managing subsistence use during times of rapid change.

Southeast

UA researchers closely monitor the region’s Suicide Basin and Mendenhall River, which have experienced dramatic outburst floods (or jökulhlaups) from the Mendenhall Glacier, affecting valley populations and infrastructure in Juneau. These monitoring efforts provide essential information to communities and partner agencies, and aid prediction, mitigation and preparation efforts.

Southwest

UA is developing and deploying new tools for monitoring coastal marine ecosystems to ensure that healthy resources remain widely available to Alaskans.

Interior, Southwest

For the first time, UA is testing and providing specific and short-term forecast products for fire managers in Alaska. Methods used in the western US to evaluate lightning ignition risk are now being tested in Alaska. These products are essential to Alaska fire manager decisions regarding how and where to allocate resources, saving money and keeping Alaskans safe.

Southwest

UA scientists are examining how important fisheries resources respond to changes in ocean chemistry such as ocean acidification. Given the importance of these resources to local and statewide economies, such knowledge of risks from both socioeconomic and biochemical perspectives is essential.

Arctic

UA scientists are examining how important fisheries resources respond to changes in ocean chemistry, including ocean acidification. Given the importance of these resources to local and statewide economies, such knowledge of risks from both socioeconomic and biochemical perspectives is essential.

Interior

Based in the thorough, investigative work of one of our own PhD students, UA is studying how to improve preparedness and response to annual springtime flooding in Alaska and other high-latitude regions. We are developing effective and easily adaptable flood risk mitigation and disaster response and recovery strategies, for use in rural Alaska communities and elsewhere.

Arctic

UA is partnering with shipping companies to better understand strong wind events and develop forecast tools for industry. Marine transporters in Alaska and the North Pacific need tailored information about sailing conditions. UAF’s new products enable quicker “go/no-go” decisions, as well as monthly to seasonal outlooks for scheduling and routing.

Southwest

UA is partnering with shipping companies to better understand strong wind events and develop forecast tools for industry. Marine transporters in Alaska and the North Pacific need tailored information about sailing conditions. UAF’s new products enable quicker “go/no-go” decisions, as well as monthly to seasonal outlooks for scheduling and routing.

Arctic

Our university helps put in place and support many different partnerships to guide research and share research findings. Here, UAF helped support and evaluate a research partnership between North Slope communities and industry. This collaboration helped bring together North Slope experts and scientists to provide information in support of responsible oil and gas development in the Arctic.

Southeast

After the fatal 2015 Sitka landslide, researchers have been assessing risk from landslides that arise from changing Pacific storm patterns. As with wildfire, landslides represent a widespread disturbance pattern that’s experiencing shifts due to climate. UA is examining how these large-scale changes can affect capacities for ecosystem and community resilience.