Jobs Research

Southwest

In 2013, the average age of Alaska fishery permit holders was 49.7 years, up ten years since 1980. As many Alaska fishery permit holders approach retirement age, next generation fishing will greatly impact coastal communities. UA is approaching the problem of the “graying of the fleet,” and developing alternatives to address this growing problem.

Arctic

Getting fiber optic cable onshore in Arctic Alaska requires detailed understanding of the ways sea ice can damage cables in areas of shallow water. Working with industry lead Quintillion Networks, researchers at UAA and UAF have helped evaluate threats from sea ice and identify the safest routes to bring fast access to Arctic Alaska. 

Arctic, Interior, Southcentral, Southeast, Southwest

Our researchers at UAF are developing and supporting the Advanced Laboratory and Field Arrays for Marine Energy project to address critical needs for lowering the cost of river and ocean energy converters, and to advance hydrokinetic energy’s role in global renewable energy.

Southeast

UA partners with NOAA’s Alaska Sea Grant, the Sitka Tribe of Alaska, and the Central Council Tlingit Haida Indian Association to support ongoing adaptation approaches, including the Southeast Alaska Climate Adaptation Planning Summit in September 2016 (Ketchikan). Tribes have learned from each other about overcoming barriers to adaptation, impacts on subsistence and cultural resources, identifying climate adaptation strategies and drafting work plans for short-term adaptations.

Southcentral

Based on analysis by oceanographers, fisheries biologists and modelers, a multi-year study of young groundfishes (walleye pollock, Pacific cod, Pacific ocean perch, sablefish, and arrowtooth flounder) is now helping enhance Gulf fisheries stock assessments by including broader and more complex ecosystem information.

Southcentral

Pacific halibut supports valuable commercial, sport and subsistence fisheries throughout the Gulf of Alaska. Declining halibut stocks over the past 20 years has led to increased restrictions for commercial and sport fisheries. Are halibut competing for shared resources with a burgeoning population of arrowtooth flounder? UAF is examining resource partitioning between arrowtooth flounder and Pacific halibut to better understand their potential competition for shared prey, including walleye pollock.

Southwest

UA researchers are using genetic markers to better identify types of western Alaska chum salmon (Norton Sound, Lower Yukon, Kuskokwim, Bristol Bay) and studying competition between these fish and stocks native to Russia and Japan. UAF research helps determine risks by linking exposure to natural hazards and the vulnerability of communities. 

Southeast

Recreational fishing contributes approximately $1.4 billion per year to coastal communities in Alaska. UA is studying patterns of responses to regulatory, environmental, and socioeconomic changes in Alaska halibut and salmon fisheries over the last three decades. This will help managers and stakeholders to better understand how future changes will affect the welfare of fishing communities in Southeast and Southcentral Alaska.

UA researchers are working with the Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association to help the 229 federally recognized tribes in Alaska prepare for and respond to changing conditions through adaptation and outreach. We are using research to identify tribal climate science needs, support adaptation planning and link tribal needs. 

Arctic, Interior, Southcentral, Southeast, Southwest

UA is forecasting and assessing the nature and scope of climate change impacts on the Alaska economy into the next 30–50 years. We’re tackling these tough questions: What is known and unknown about the economic effects of Alaska’s changing climate? What additional research, data collection and information gathering are necessary to fill these information gaps?